Categories
Carers Mental Health

Driving Change in the ‘Care System’

Launch of The Promise Partnership Fund.

Care-experienced young people will be at the heart of a £4 million fund to help improve the lives of those in or on the edges of care.

The Promise Partnership Fund will help organisations to implement changes so they can better support children, young people and families who need it.

Private, public and third sector organisations can apply and care-experienced young people will assist in the final funding decisions.

Deputy First Minister John Swinney said:

“The Promise Partnership Fund is an important step towards keeping The Promise to bring transformational changes to the lives of children, young people and families in or on the edges care.

“We have already seen many partners take the principles of the Promise to the heart of their organisations. This initial funding towards keeping the Promise will help organisations to make the changes that are necessary to improve holistic family support, so that families are listened to and get the support where they need it, when they need it and for as long as they need it.

“It is absolutely right that care-experienced young people and families will be at the heart of The Promise Partnership Fund decision-making process.”

Fiona Duncan, Chair of The Promise, said:

“Despite a difficult year, it is clear that organisations and individuals all across Scotland recognise their responsibility to and are working towards Keeping their Promise to children and families. The Promise Partnership is an important step towards helping change happen right now and in the future.”

Background

The CORRA foundation is administering the fund and details on eligibility and how to apply are on their website.  Applications will close on 1 March.

Categories
Carers Coronavirus Health

Extra Funding to Support Unpaid Carers

Additional £750,000 investment will help people take a break from caring roles.

An investment of £750,000 in local carer centres will increase support for unpaid carers of all ages, helping them to take a break from caring and access other much-needed help.

This recognises some of the challenges faced by unpaid carers, with many regular sources of support having stopped or moved online due to the pandemic.

It also comes in response to concerns about increasing pressure on carers – particularly while many traditional respite breaks are restricted or unavailable.

The funding will allow local carer centres to react flexibly to the needs of carers in their areas. Feedback from national and local carer representatives suggests there is a demand for extending existing services such as befriending, counselling or online support groups, as well as offering additional grants for carers which can be used for expenditure such as leisure equipment, hobbies or entertainment subscriptions.

Health Secretary Jeane Freeman said:

“Unpaid carers play a vital role in society but without the right support, caring relationships can break down, which can result additional health or social care support being needed for the cared for person, their carer, or both.

“This funding will enable carer centres to decide how best to promptly meet local need. It is designed to ensure more unpaid carers – including young carers – can benefit from a much-needed break and emotional support.”

On behalf of Scotland’s National Carer Organisations, Don Williamson, Chief Executive of Shared Care Scotland, said:

“COVID-19 has made life hugely challenging for unpaid carers, many of whom are struggling on with little or no opportunity to have any breaks from their caring. We therefore very much welcome this additional funding from Scottish Government which will go towards increasing the capacity of local carer services so they can provide support to more carers, including with accessing breaks, to help them over the particularly difficult winter months.”